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  • S18 E18: Custom Screen Door, Paint Trim
    by Ask This Old House TV on April 5, 2020 at 11:00 PM

    Ross tests out some new smart lighting configurations, and Tom helps a homeowner build a custom screen door. Richard gives general advice on maintaining a washing machine, and Mauro teaches a homeowner techniques to paint old 1960s wood trim with a varnish on it. Previous episode: S18 E17 | Next episode: Posting on Apr. 12, 8pm ET In this episode: Ross Trethewey tests out some new smart lighting configurations, and Tom Silva helps a homeowner build a custom screen door to fit her unique front entryway. Richard Trethewey gives some general advice on maintaining a washing machine, and Mauro Henrique teaches a homeowner some techniques to paint old 1960s wood trim with a varnish on it. How to Control Smart Lighting Ross Trethewey tests out some new smart lighting configurations. Where to find it? Ross demonstrated the Aurora Smart Bulb Dimmer, which is designed to work with Philips Hue light bulbs and is manufactured by Lutron. How to Build and Hang a Custom Screen Door Tom Silva helps a homeowner build a custom screen door to fit her unique front entryway. Where to find it? To build the frame of the door, Tom used 5/4” x 8” x 8’ straight grain fir, which was provided by Baird Brothers Fine Hardwoods. For exterior doors, Tom finds it very important to prevent the wood from warping in any direction, which is why he recommended using a combination of a half lap and a floating tenon for the joinery. To make those cuts, he used a Domino Joiner, which is manufactured by Festool and a Jobsite Saw Pro, which is manufactured by SawStop. To secure the boards together, Tom used wood glue by Gorilla Glue. To trim the door to size, Tom used a TS 55 circular saw, which is also manufactured by Festool. The corner accent brackets and the antique hardware were either found or salvaged by the homeowner, but similar products can be found online, at hardware stores, at specialty woodworking shops, or antique sales/salvage yards. The hinges and the screen door compressor can both be bought at home centers. In this case, Tom used heavy duty screen door hardware to handle the weight of the large door, and two compressors on the top and bottom of the door to control the swing of the heavy door and to ensure it closed tightly. The screening material they used for the door can be found at any home center. Tom recommends using clamps to slightly bow the door during the installation of the screen to ensure a tight fit. To secure the trim pieces over the screen, Tom used a 20V Max Cordless Bradnailer, which is manufactured by Dewalt. How to Maintain a Washing Machine Richard Trethewey gives some general advice on maintaining a washing machine. Where to find it? Braided stainless steel washing machine hoses can be found at home centers. The timed washing machine valve that only keeps pressure on the hoses for a set period of time is the Time Out Automatic Shutoff Valve, manufactured by Keeney Manufacturing Company. 
The washing machine valve that only operates when it senses a current draw from the washer is the IntelliFlow, manufactured by Watts. Both of these valves can be ordered online or from a specialty plumbing supplier. How to Paint Old Wood Trim with Varnish on It Mauro teaches a homeowner some techniques to paint old 1960s wood trim with a varnish on it. Where to find it? Mauro explained that in rooms with wood trim that has a finish applied to it, it’s helpful to lightly sand the surface using 220 grit sandpaper to give the paint more to adhere to. For this project, he used a ProSand Contour Sanding Sponge, which is manufactured by Norton Abrasives. To ensure a solid base for the paint, Mauro primed the trim with Stix Waterborne Bonding Primer, which is manufactured by INSL-X. Mauro decided to do two coats of primer in this case, since he thought it was more important to ensure a strong, even base for the paint. The homeowner had already purchased paint for the room, so Mauro finished the room using the same paint. She had selected Sherwin Williams paint in Extra White with a semi-gloss finish. This one doesn’t need to be mixed as it’s available right off the shelf. The other materials Mauro used to paint the trim, including the drop cloths, brushes, painter’s tape, and buckets, can all be found at home centers and paint supply stores. Original Air Date: April 5, 2020 Season 18; Ep.18 23:43 Products and Services from this Episode Smart LightingAurora Smart Bulb DimmerPhilips Hue light bulbs LumberBaird Brothers Fine Hardwoods Cutting toolsDomino Joiner manufactured by FestoolJobsite Saw Pro manufactured by SawStopTS 55 circular saw manufactured by Festool Wood glueGorilla Glue Brad nailer20V Max Cordless Brad nailer manufactured by Dewalt Timed washing machine valvesTime Out Automatic Shutoff Valve manufactured by Keeney Manufacturing CompanyIntelliFlow manufactured by Watts Sanding toolProSand Contour Sanding Sponge manufactured by Norton Abrasives PrimerStix Waterborne Bonding Primer manufactured by INSL-X PaintExtra White with a semi-gloss finish made by Sherwin Williams

  • How to Maintain a Washing Machine
    by Richard Trethewey on April 5, 2020 at 11:00 PM

    Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey gives some general advice on maintaining a washing machine. Steps for Maintaining a Washing Machine: Ensure that the washing machine is level so it doesn’t bounce around during cycles. Most have adjustable feet that can be tightened or loosened to reach the appropriate height. There are filters at the end of the washing machines hoses at the back of the washer. If there’s ever a decrease in water pressure in the machine, he suggests shutting off the water and unscrewing those hoses to check the filters to see if they’re clogged. Since rubber hoses are prone to bursting, Richard recommends using a stainless steel braided washing machine hose. Richard also highly recommends taking advantage of a washing machine valve, which can be installed near the water supply for the washing machine and can control water flow to the machine. That way, if the hoses were ever to fail, they wouldn’t be under full water pressure and there would be an easy control point to diagnose any issues. Resources: Braided stainless steel washing machine hoses can be found at home centers. The timed washing machine valve that only keeps pressure on the hoses for a set period of time is the Time Out Automatic Shutoff Valve, manufactured by Keeney Manufacturing Company.
The washing machine valve that only operates when it senses a current draw from the washer is the IntelliFlow, manufactured by Watts. Both of these valves can be ordered online or from a specialty plumbing supplier. Shopping List: Washing machine hosesWashing machine valve Tools:

  • How to Paint Old Varnished Wood Trim
    by Mauro Henrique on April 5, 2020 at 11:00 PM

    Ask This Old House painter Mauro Henrique teaches a homeowner some techniques to paint old 1960s wood trim with a varnish on it Steps for Painting Old Wood Trim: Start by protecting the floors and walls with painter’s tape. Mauro likes to use a wider masking tape on the floor and then cover that with the drop cloth to ensure a clean cutting edge. Tape the walls using regular painter’s tape. If you’re also painting the walls, then don’t worry about taping since the spillover can be covered up with the new paint. Lightly sand all the wood trim using a 220 grit sandpaper. This should help break up the varnish and give the primer a solid base to adhere to. Vacuum up as much of the dust from sanding as possible. Then, wipe down each surface with a tack cloth to ensure no dust was left behind. Prime all the surfaces using the bonding primer and a paint brush. Start by cutting the edges of the trim and then paint the flat surfaces. Allow the primer to dry. Then, repeat this process with the latex paint. Apply 2-3 coats, allowing each coat to dry before applying the next one. Resources: Mauro explained that in rooms with wood trim that has a finish applied to it, it’s helpful to lightly sand the surface using 220 grit sandpaper to give the paint more to adhere to. For this project, he used a ProSand Contour Sanding Sponge, which is manufactured by Norton Abrasives. To ensure a solid base for the paint, Mauro primed the trim with Stix Waterborne Bonding Primer, which is manufactured by INSL-X. Mauro decided to do two coats of primer in this case, since he thought it was more important to ensure a strong, even base for the paint. The homeowner had already purchased paint for the room, so Mauro finished the room using the same paint. She had selected Sherwin Williams paint in Extra White with a semi-gloss finish. This one doesn’t need to be mixed as it’s available right off the shelf. The other materials Mauro used to paint the trim, including the drop cloths, brushes, painter’s tape, and buckets, can all be found at home centers and paint supply stores. Shopping List: Masking tapePainter’s tapeTack clothBonding primerLatex paint Tools:

  • How to Control Smart Lighting
    by Ross Trethewey on April 5, 2020 at 11:00 PM

    Ask This Old House home technology expert Ross Trethewey tests out some new smart lighting configurations. Steps for Controlling Smart Lighting: Ross explains a couple of different ways to create a smart lighting configuration in a home. Ross starts by discussing smart light switches, which can be used to replace old, standard switches. Then, all the smarts of the lighting configuration are embedded in the switch itself and can be used with any lighting fixtures. Ross does warn, however, that this requires wiring the new switch, which should be done by an electrician. A simpler option is to purchase smart bulbs, which require no wiring whatsoever. Simply unscrew the old bulb and screw the new, smart one in. These will only take advantage of their smart features IF the light switch at the wall remains in the on position. A hybrid option is to use a wireless remote. The mounting bracket locks onto the light switch, which keeps it in the on position and prevents it from being turned off, and the wireless remote can be pushed on/off or dialed for dimming capabilities. Then, the smart bulbs can still be controlled by the app and it’s less likely they’ll be powered off. Ross does warn that in this case, power is constantly running to the light fixtures. He suggests caution when changing out the lightbulbs. Resources: Ross demonstrated the Aurora Smart Bulb Dimmer, which is designed to work with Philips Hue light bulbs and is manufactured by Lutron. Shopping List: Smart switchSmart bulbWireless remote

  • How to Build and Hang a Custom Screen Door
    by Tom Silva on April 5, 2020 at 11:00 PM

    Ask This Old House general contractor helps a homeowner build a custom screen door to fit her unique front entryway. Steps for Building and Hanging a Custom Screen Door: Start by cutting the boards to size. In order to allow for the half lap joints on the rails, allow for an additional 2” for the length of the rails. This will allow for a 1” half lap joint on both sides. Cut the boards to size using a miter saw. Be sure to square up an end before making your cuts. Next, cut the rabbets and half laps on all the stiles and rails. Tom recommends doing this on a table saw with a jig so that the cutoffs can be saved and reused to cover the staple marks on the screen later on. Lay all the pieces of the door on a work bench in the configuration they’re going to be assembled in. Mark on the stiles and rails all the locations for the mortise and tenons. Once those marks are made, mortise out all the holes using a mortising machine. Assemble the door using wood glue and tenons. It should be a nice, tight fit, so you’ll probably need a rubber mallet and a shim to secure it in position. Clamp the door together and allow the wood glue to dry. Cut off any excess on the bottom of the door using a track saw. Install the corner brackets around the top opening of the door. Drill a pilot hole in the door, and then screw them in using weather-resistant screws and the drill driver. Once the glue has dried, attach the screen. To ensure there’s enough tension on the door, put a filler piece of wood underneath the top and bottom of the door. Then, on the middle section of the door, use two clamps the clamp the door to the workbench. This should cause the door to bow slightly. Unroll the screening and get it into position along the door. With it held tightly against the door, staple the screen in using a staple gun. Cut off the excess screening with a utility knife. Once the screen is tightly secured to the door, release the tension from the clamps. Use the cutoffs from the half lap/rabbet cuts on the table saw to hide the staples of the screen. This will require mitering the edges of each one using the miter saw. Secure the cutoffs to the door using a brad nailer. Hold the door in the opening and measure/mark it so that the door will fit tightly in the opening. Cut the door to size both width and height using the track saw. Tom suggests focusing on the width first, then carrying it back to the opening to get the height. He also suggests tilting the angle of the saw by a few degrees so that the door fits snug in the opening towards the outside, but is still easy to operate. Once the door fits, attach the hardware by drilling pilot holes and screwing it onto the door where appropriate. Hang the door and secure the other side of the hinges to the jamb. Once the door is in position, add a compressor to both the top and bottom of the door. The compressors can usually be installed by drilling in a few screws. Apply a desired finish to ensure it does well in the weather. Resources: To build the frame of the door, Tom used 5/4” x 8” x 8’ straight grain fir, which was provided by Baird Brothers Fine Hardwoods. For exterior doors, Tom finds it very important to prevent the wood from warping in any direction, which is why he recommended using a combination of a half lap and a floating tenon for the joinery. To make those cuts, he used a Domino Joiner, which is manufactured by Festool and a Jobsite Saw Pro, which is manufactured by SawStop. To secure the boards together, Tom used wood glue by Gorilla Glue. To trim the door to size, Tom used a TS 55 circular saw, which is also manufactured by Festool. The corner accent brackets and the antique hardware were either found or salvaged by the homeowner, but similar products can be found online, at hardware stores, at specialty woodworking shops, or at antique sales/salvage yards. The hinges and the screen door compressor can both be bought at home centers. In this case, Tom used heavy duty screen door hardware to handle the weight of the large door, and two compressors on the top and bottom of the door to control the swing of the heavy door and to ensure it closed tightly. The screening material they used for the door can be found at any home center. Tom recommends using clamps to slightly bow the door during the installation of the screen to ensure a tight fit. To secure the trim pieces over the screen, Tom used a 20V Max Cordless Brad nailer, which is manufactured by Dewalt. Shopping List: 5/4” x 8” x 8’ straight grain firWood glueVictorian corner bracketsWeather resistant screwsScreeningBrad nailsSurface mounted screen door hardwareScreen door compressors Tools:

  • Current Obsessions: In Praise of Craft
    by Remodelista Team on April 4, 2020 at 1:00 PM

    On the market: A John Pawson house in Notting Hill, designed in the 1990s for his own family and miraculously untouched. (And for a smaller dose of John Pawson, see his collection of home goods at March.) Good Design, Good Purpose: Enter to Win Two Ethically Made Pillows from Goodee, one our favorite purveyors of

  • How to Care for Candles: Tips from a Brooklyn Shop
    by Annie Quigley on April 3, 2020 at 10:00 AM

    Back in January, I made a resolution for the year: “More candles. More candles at the breakfast table, more light in winter, more settling in, more slow mornings, more romance in design, more making more of small moments.” I’ve been thinking about that urge a lot these last weeks, in these uncertain and isolated and anxious

  • English-Style in Seattle: A Couple’s Longtime Home Gets an Anglo Update
    by Margot Guralnick on April 3, 2020 at 8:00 AM

    Spending all this time in our own quarters leads to restless thinking—of making home improvements or of moving on, maybe to another planet. Today we’re spotlighting the longtime family home of a couple with grown children who felt very ready for a change but decided to stay put. Their place, a charming but compact 1915

  • The Comfort of Things: Artist Oscar Piccolo’s Modern Bohemian Studio Apartment
    by Margot Guralnick on April 2, 2020 at 10:00 AM

    “I’ve never been by myself so much, but I’m treating this period as a good pause,” London designer Oscar Piccolo tells us. “I’ve always felt connected to domestic spaces so I am finding this aspect interesting. My home is my studio, really the two go hand in hand.” A 2018 fine arts graduate of London’s

  • Kitchen of the Week: A ‘Frankensteined’ Historic House in Philadelphia’s Fishtown, Before and After
    by Margot Guralnick on April 2, 2020 at 8:00 AM

    It was a gray waxed canvas tote that first caught my eye thanks to its leather strap made from a World War II gun sling. That was at a trade show several years ago, where Margaux and Walter Kent of Peg and Awl were also showcasing wooden bath trays, “apothecary cabinets”, and rope tree swings,

  • #169: How Exactly Do You Downsize Your Stuff?!
    by John Petersik on April 6, 2020 at 5:00 AM

    As we prepare to move into a house that’s less than half the size of our current one, we’re taking a long hard look at our belongings to figure out what should come and what we no longer need, love, or have a use for. And today we’re outlining the systematic criteria that we’re using to evaluate what to bring and what to leave behind (yes, we actually have four questions that we consider for every last object). Plus we’re sharing how we’re getting rid of the things we don’t need, including different ways to donate (and some great causes to consider), along with a recent technique that we tried (and it worked!) for selling a whole lot of things in one fell swoop. We’ve also got a big update on how coronavirus has impacted our moving plans and the answer to that “what happened to the shutters you were putting on your house?” question that we get every time we share an exterior photo.  Continue reading #169: How Exactly Do You Downsize Your Stuff?! at Young House Love.

  • Our T-Shirt Line Is Baaaaaaaack!
    by John Petersik on April 1, 2020 at 2:05 PM

    Over 10 years ago we launched a small t-shirt line featuring designs for women, men, and – yes – even dogs! I’m not kidding. Who remembers that?! We eventually retired it, so who knows how many still exist out there in the wild – beyond the dozen or so in my dad’s closet (he was our best customer) and the one below that showed up at a book signing in 2015. Earlier this year we got the itch to relaunch the line, but this time with a shift away from logo shirts and towards styles that could fit easily into anyone’s closet… all while maintaining a distinctly Young House Love look. So for months we’ve been fine-tuning the designs, researching the best fitting tees, and even “test-wearing” them around the house. So without further ado, we’re THRILLED to launch them today – complete with a little video to show you the whole collection (it’s actually very important that you watch this, so please press play): Note: If you’re having trouble viewing the video above, you can watch it here on YouTube. Continue reading Our T-Shirt Line Is Baaaaaaaack! at Young House Love.

  • #168: Our Florida Renovation Kicks Off With (Surprise!) A Plumbing Issue
    by John Petersik on March 30, 2020 at 5:00 AM

    We knew our new house in Florida would involve some big repairs, but we didn’t anticipate a certain plumbing curveball to get lobbed our way (although given our past plumbing luck, maybe we should have seen this coming). So this week we’re sharing how it popped up, why it cost thousands of dollars, and what we’re doing to resolve it. And with so many people suddenly working from home, we’re sharing our top tips for being productive in a home office (even a temporary one) – including what has and hasn’t worked for us over the last decade. Plus, the app that’s blowing our minds and the binge-worthy show that we still can’t believe. You can download this episode from Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn Radio, and Spotify – or listen to it below!  What’s New Well, our plumbing “curse” followed us to Florida with the revelation that our house was NOT hooked up to the county sewer system, as the real estate listing indicated. Continue reading #168: Our Florida Renovation Kicks Off With (Surprise!) A Plumbing Issue at Young House Love.

  • Turning A Mostly Unused Room Into A Kids Art & Work Space
    by John Petersik on March 24, 2020 at 8:33 PM

    Some of you will remember that way back in January, Sherry talked about grabbing these wood chairs from Target on Instagram Stories for “a side project we’re working on that we’ll share after we complete the bathroom.” And then the bathroom dragged on for a few more months (you can see the finished product & full budget breakdown here) and somewhere in there this big thing happened too. So while we’ve been enjoying this completely new room for a few months, we’re excited to FINALLY share the update with you guys. So let’s show you around and tell you why we decided to revamp this room. chairs | drawers | legs | counter | rug | blinds | similar string lights| wall color: Behr Irish Mist The space you’re looking at is actually our old guest room, which you may remember looking like the picture below. Continue reading Turning A Mostly Unused Room Into A Kids Art & Work Space at Young House Love.

  • #167: Have Our Moving Plans Changed? And Are Our House Sales Derailed?
    by John Petersik on March 23, 2020 at 5:00 AM

    With everything that’s going on right now, we’re the first to admit that house stuff feels trivial, but we’re keeping our podcast going in the hopes that it’s a welcome escape for anyone tuning in (it’s definitely a nice distraction for us). This week we’re answering the most common question we’ve gotten in the last few days: how the coronavirus is impacting our Florida move and our house sales (spoiler alert: one contract has fallen through). We’re also having a strangely thorough discussion about high-tech toilets and bidets. Plus, we’re sharing two things that are helping us make the most of being home with kids 24/7. You can download this episode from Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn Radio, and Spotify – or listen to it below!  What’s New Note: As promised we’ve rounded up ways that you can help people during the pandemic at the bottom of this post In case you need the backstory on some of the news we updated you on in today’s episode, these links will be helpful: We’re moving to Florida! Continue reading #167: Have Our Moving Plans Changed? And Are Our House Sales Derailed? at Young House Love.

  • How to Celebrate Easter in 2020 – Our “Plan” and Some Ideas
    by Emily on April 5, 2020 at 6:55 PM

    Holidays are milestones, even the ones that haven’t historically been “the big ones,” but when you have kids (especially in the long stretch between Christmas and summer) you need these touchpoints – things to look forward to, most importantly fictional characters to threaten them for year-round good behavior (I’M JOKING I WOULD NEVER TREAT THE… Read More The post How to Celebrate Easter in 2020 – Our “Plan” and Some Ideas appeared first on Emily Henderson.

  • The Link Up: Emily CUTE $40 Puffer Jacket, Julie’s Pancake Recipe & A Brand New Newsletter By An EHD Alum
    by EHD on April 5, 2020 at 8:00 AM

    How’s it going? Life may seem wildly uncertain right now (because it is) so our hope is that here, you give yourself permission to take your mind off the news and escape for even just a moment. In hopes to continue to provide that space, here is what EHD has been watching, reading, and finding… Read More The post The Link Up: Emily CUTE $40 Puffer Jacket, Julie’s Pancake Recipe & A Brand New Newsletter By An EHD Alum appeared first on Emily Henderson.

  • 11 Unique Ways To Stay Connected While Apart
    by Sara Tramp on April 4, 2020 at 7:09 PM

    There’s no denying – I (Sara) lean more introvert than I do extrovert. So I’ve been finding some real silver linings with my sudden lack of social obligations. I know that I’m going through this situation with a list of undeniable privileges (I have a safe home to live in and feel safe being here… Read More The post 11 Unique Ways To Stay Connected While Apart appeared first on Emily Henderson.

  • Brian’s Magical Mind-Trick to Get Through Homeschooling the Kids (And Even Be a Better Teacher)
    by EHD on April 4, 2020 at 8:00 AM

    Remember when your older brother would pin you down on the ground, take your hands and whap you in the face and ask, “WHY ARE YOU HITTING YOURSELF?? WHY ARE YOU HITTING YOURSELF??”? Ughhhhh. It was the worst. Maybe not as bad as when he would snort up a big ol’ loogie and dangle it… Read More The post Brian’s Magical Mind-Trick to Get Through Homeschooling the Kids (And Even Be a Better Teacher) appeared first on Emily Henderson.

  • A Review of a Friend’s book – Jen Gotch’s “The Upside Of Being Down”
    by Emily on April 3, 2020 at 6:55 PM

    I’ll start by saying that there is a clear thesis to this post – everyone should read Jen Gotch’s book, “The Upside To Being Down.” But if you need some convincing, allow me. Ahem. The last long one-on-one I had with Jen Gotch was way too many months ago, but the 4-hour conversation over margaritas… Read More The post A Review of a Friend’s book – Jen Gotch’s “The Upside Of Being Down” appeared first on Emily Henderson.