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  • How to Build a DIY Pet House
    by Jenn Largesse on May 29, 2020 at 3:29 PM

    Jenn Largesse Build your dog or cat a stylish home using a half sheet of plywood. Download these plans and watch the video for instructions on how to build it. Build your pet a stylish home from a half sheet of plywood. Download my plans for an easy cut layout, and let the sawdust fly! In just a few hours, you cat or dog will thank you for the stylish new digs. Note: This DIY pet house is sized for a small cat or dog at under two feet wide. Steps for Building a Dog or Cat House: Step 1: Layout the cuts To begin, mark the plywood using my diagram in the downloadable plans above. Apply painter’s tape to the plywood, and mark the cut lines with a marker. Covering the cut lines with painter’s tape will reduce chipping during the cuts. Step 2: Set the saw Set the bevel on the circular saw to 50-degrees for the first two cuts. Step 3: Make the cuts Section the plywood into four pieces using two beveled cuts and one cut at zero-degrees, as noted on the diagram in the downloadable plans above. Step 4: Cutout the door Using a drill/driver, bore a hole inside the door outline. Place the blade of a jigsaw into the hole, and then cut the outline. Step 5: Assemble the base Apply wood glue to the front and back edges of the side panels. Position the sides between the front and back panels. Using a nailer, drive 1½-inch nails through the front and back panels and into the edges of the side panels. Step 6: Attach the roof Apply wood glue to the top edges of the assembled base. Position the roof panels. Drive 1½-inch nails through the roof panels and into the front and back panels. Step 7: Add the chimney Jenn Largesse Cut the chimney pieces to size. (Tip: this can be done by marking the lines and cutting the pieces with a circular saw, or using a miter saw set 50-degrees to match the angle of the roofline.) Apply wood glue between the pieces, and then nail them together with 1½-inch nails. Center the chimney on the left roof panel. Outline the chimney on the roof. Apply wood glue to the underside of the chimney. Position the chimney, and then nail through the base of the chimney and into the roof. Tools: Materials: 3/4” x 4’ x 4’ Sanded Plywood Painter’s Tape 1 1/2” Nails

  • Build a DIY Magazine Rack
    by Jenn Largesse on May 29, 2020 at 3:26 PM

    Jenn Largesse A DIY wall magazine rack is the perfect place to store and display your favorite magazines. The clear front and slim design is also perfect for displaying photos, records, and other artwork. Watch this video for instructions on how to build a magazine rack for your home. For this project, I’m using a small piece of plywood (sometimes called a “project panel” at the home center), a 1 x 2 board, and a thin acrylic sheet. To keep the design looking clean and fastener-free, I’m assembling it using a very strong glue called Clear Gorilla Glue. Download the plans for this wooden magazine rack below. Steps for Building a Magazine Rack Step 1: Prep the plywood Jenn Largesse Using the cut list above, mark the cut lines on the plywood. Place the plywood up on blocks, or so that the cut line is overhanging the edge of the work surface. Clamp the plywood in place. Tip: Place a piece of painters tape inside each cut line to protect the edges from chipping. Step 2: Cut the plywood Jenn Largesse Using a circular saw, cut along the first line. Reposition the plywood, clamp it to the work surface, and then cut along the second line. Step 3: Cut the 1x2 pieces Jenn Largesse Using a miter saw, cut the 1 x 2 pieces to length to make the sides, bottom, and divider. Step 4: Sand the pieces Jenn Largesse Using a sanding sponge, lightly sand the edges and face of the plywood and 1 x 2 pieces. Step 5: Prep the acrylic Jenn Largesse Apply a piece of painters tape along the center of the acrylic sheet. Using a permanent marker, mark a centerline on the tape. Step 6: Cut the acrylic Jenn Largesse Using a miter saw (or circular saw) cut the acrylic to size. The acrylic can also be scored with a utility knife, and snapped along the line. Step 7: Layout the pieces Jenn Largesse Layout the pieces so that the 1 x 2 boards rest on the plywood. Position the bottom 1 x 2 board between the sides. Center the divider. Place the acrylic pieces across the sides and divider about two inches from the bottom edge. Step 8: Dampen one side of the connection Jenn Largesse Because Clear Gorilla Glue is activated by moisture, first wet the plywood beneath the bottom 1 x 2 board with a damp cloth. Step 9: Apply glue to the boards Jenn Largesse Apply a thin bead of glue to the underside of the bottom board. Step 10: Clamp the board Jenn Largesse Place the board onto the plywood. Using hand clamps, apply even pressure to the connection between the board and plywood. Repeat to secure the remaining 1 x 2 boards using a damp cloth, Clear Gorilla Glue, and clamps. Step 11: Prep the acrylic sheet Jenn Largesse Remove the painter’s tape and protective coating on each side of the acrylic sheet. Step 12: Wet the connection Jenn Largesse Wet the 1 x 2 sides and divider where the acrylic sheet will rest. Step 13: Apply glue to the acrylic Jenn Largesse Apply a thin bead of glue along each edge of the acrylic pieces Step 14: Secure the acrylic Jenn Largesse Position the acrylic pieces onto the assembly, about 2 inches from the bottom edge, or so that their top edge sets flush with the height of the 1 x 2 divider. Keep the pieces clamped for two hours. Allow the assembly to cure for 24 hours before use. Step 15: Mount the magazine rack Jenn Largesse Drive two nails or screws through the magazine rack and into the wall to hold it in place. As always, hitting a stud with at least one of the fasteners is recommended. Materials: Clear Gorilla Glue (1) 1/4” x 2’ x 2’ Sanded Plywood (1) 1 x 2 x 8 Boards (1) .093” x 11” x 14” Acrylic Sheet Nitril Gloves Rag Sanding Sponge Painter’s Tape Tools:

  • How to Use a Battery-Powered Pneumatic Nailer
    by Jenn Largesse on May 29, 2020 at 3:21 PM

    Pneumatic Nailers used to require a compressor and hose, and came with a hefty price tag. Now, cordless options make them much more DIY-friendly. Watch the video to get an idea of the basics and why you shouldn’t be scared to use a battery-powered nail gun on your next project.

  • How to Roll on a Painted Pattern
    by Deborah Baldwin on May 29, 2020 at 3:17 PM

    Andrew McCaul The base of a bookcase is the perfect place for a pop of color or pattern To lay a foundation, we first removed the shelves added a base coat of Sherwin-Williams Emerald® Interior Acrylic Latex Paint in matte in Pure White SW 7005. For the pattern, we selected a semigloss finish in Copper Wire SW 7707 applied using a cut-rubber design roller, in a pattern called Quills from Rollerwall to put down feathers in a semigloss finish one vertical row after another—like wallpaper. The roller creates a natural frame on all sides; to avoid this, you could roll the pattern on wallpaper liner and paste it in place. But once we’d arranged a few of our favorite things, all we could see was our built-in’s lively new look. Learn how to use patterned paint rollers in our guide below. Steps for rolling on a painted pattern: Step 1: Mark the design roller Andrew McCaul To achieve wallpaper-like repeats, mark the roller with a + at any point and with a − halfway around. You’ll start the first row with the + up, the next with the − up. Insert both rollers in the frame; you should have a frictionless close fit. Step 2: Load the paint Andrew McCaul Fill the tray with latex paint in a semigloss finish. Remove the design roller and run the foam roller through the paint, covering it completely. Roll it once on paper to remove excess. Now mount the design roller and roll it on paper to make sure it’s right-side up. Step 3: Put down the first row Andrew McCaul Align the + on the design roller with the top left-hand corner and move from top to bottom, angling the roller at about 45 degrees. Step 4: Make a second pass Andrew McCaul Align the next row with the − on the design roller at the top. Draw the roller down, taking care to avoid a gap between the rows. After three rows, or when the paint begins to fade, repeat Step 2. Materials: Sherwin-Williams Emerald® Interior Acrylic Latex Paint in Matte Finish Sherwin-Williams Emerald® Interior Acrylic Latex Paint in Semigloss Finish Roller Tray and Liners Pattern Applicator and Pattern Roller Tools:

  • How to Build a Wooden Clothes Rack
    by Jenn Largesse on May 29, 2020 at 3:15 PM

    Jenn Largesse If you’re short on closet space, this DIY hanging clothes rack is the perfect solution. You can build your own clothes rack with a few basic tools—plus can be moved anywhere, and takes up very little space.  If you’re short on closet space, this DIY hanging clothes rack is the perfect solution. You can build your own clothes rack with a few basic tools - plus can be moved anywhere, and takes up very little space. That’s because it’s made up of just two side legs with a support shelf and hanging rod in between. For this project, I’m using stock boards and a dowel from the home center, a miter saw to cut them to length, and a drill/driver to assemble the pieces with fasteners and polyurethane glue. Steps for Building a Wood Clothes Rack Step 1: Mark the legs Jenn Largesse To begin, we’ll mark the height of the shelf and location of the hanging rod on each of the four 1×2 Legs. To do so, make a mark 8 inches from each end of the boards. Mark the center-point on each line. Step 2: Prep the legs for assembly Jenn Largesse Using a drill/driver, drill a ¼-inch pilot hole through crosshair marked on each board. Step 3: Miter the base of each leg Jenn Largesse To allow the Legs to tilt to create an A-frame on each side of the rack, miter the bottom of each leg at 10-degrees using a miter saw. Step 4: Cut the remaining parts Jenn Largesse Using a miter saw and the downloadable cut list above cut the 1×2, 2×2, and the square and round dowels to length. Step 5: Understanding Insert Nuts Jenn Largesse To assemble the pieces, we need to screw into end grain, which isn’t very sturdy. To make a stronger connection we’ll add insert nuts to the connection points where the shelf and hanging rod meet the legs. Insert nuts are a threaded metal tube that the bolt can screw into securely so you don’t have to worry about the bolt tearing out of the end Step 6: Prep the shelf pieces for assembly Jenn Largesse To give the connection between the Legs and Shelf added strength, we’ll install insert nuts into the end of the Shelf Front and Back boards. To install the insert nuts, first drive an 11/16-inch hole into the ends of each board using a drill/driver. Step 7: Insert the nuts into the shelf Jenn Largesse Place the insert nut into the hole, and then tap in into place with a hammer. Step 8: Prep the hanging rod for assembly Jenn Largesse Drive a centered 11/16-inch hole into the ends of the hanging rod using a drill/driver. Step 9: Install the insert nuts into the hanging rod Jenn Largesse Place the insert nut into the hole, and then tap in into place with a hammer. Step 10: Layout the shelf frame Jenn Largesse Place the 2×2 Shelf Frame pieces on the work surface. Place the sides between the front and back pieces. The front piece will overhang the sides by ¾-inch on each side to reach the outer legs once the pieces are assembled. Step 11: Prep the 2x2’s and cleats Jenn Largesse To assemble the Shelf without fasteners, we’re using a polyurethane glue called Original Gorilla Glue. It’s a polyurethane glue that activates with water and expands into the wood and creates and incredibly strong bond. To apply the glue, first dampen a cloth with water. Next, run the cloth over one of the surfaces. In this case I’ll dampen one side of the 2×2. Step 12: Apply the glue Jenn Largesse Wearing gloves, apply a thin bead of Original Gorilla Glue to the dry surface—in this case, our cleat. Spread the glue with a scrap brush or rag (i.e. not your finger). Step 13: Position the cleat Jenn Largesse Center the Cleat on the Front 2×2, flush with its bottom edge. Use the end of a 2×2 plus a 1×2 as a spacer at each end of the cleat to check the placement. Step 14: Clamp the cleat into the 2x2 Jenn Largesse Using hand clamps, hold the cleat in place. Wipe away any excess glue with a rag or cloth. Step 15: Attach the cleat to the remaining 2x2 Jenn Largesse Repeat to assemble the remaining Cleat and 2×2 Shelf Back Board, noting that the end of a 2 x 2 should fit at each end of the Cleat once the Cleat is centered on the 2×2. Step 16: Add the shelf sides Jenn Largesse Clamp the Sides between the Front and Back of the Shelf. Set the assembled shelf frame aside to dry for 1-2 hours. Note Original Gorilla Glue will continue to cure and to its maximum strength over a period of 24 hours. Step 17: Position the legs for assembly Jenn Largesse Overlap the Legs to that their mitered ends face opposite directions, and the back Leg sets under the front Leg. Place individual 1½-inch Connection Bolts through the two lower holes where the Legs will connect to the Shelf. Step 18: Insert the upper bolts Jenn Largesse Place a 2¼-inch Connection Bolt through the upper hole, extending through both boards. Step 19: Secure the shelf between the legs Jenn Largesse Place the Shelf between the Legs. Damped the inside face of each Leg, and then apply Original Gorilla Glue to the end of connection point on the Shelf. Insert and tighten connection bolts through each Leg and into the Shelf. Step 20: Assemble the legs and hanging rods Jenn Largesse Wet the inside face of each Leg, and apply a dab of Original Gorilla Glue to end of the Hanging Rod, and outside face of the sandwiched Leg face. Insert a connection bolt through the hole in each Leg and into the Hanging Rod. Thread the bolt into the insert nut. Position the base of the Legs to align with the holes in the Shelf before tightening the bolt into the Hanging Rod. Repeat to assemble the reaming Legs. Step 21: Prep the shelf slats Jenn Largesse To prep the shelf for slats, dampen the top edge of each cleat with a wet cloth. Apply a small amount of Original Gorilla Glue to the ends and underside of each Slat near its ends where it will rest on the Cleat. Step 22: Install the shelf slats Jenn Largesse Place the Slats one-by-one onto the cleats using a scrap block to create ¾-inch spacing. To “clamp” the Slats in place, we placed heavy books or box on the shelf for 1-2 hours. Once the glue is dry, remove the heavy object. Allow the glue to fully cure for 24 hours before using the assembled clothes rack. Materials: (5) 1 x 2 x 6 Boards – to make the Legs and Shelf Slats (2) 2 x 2 x 6 Boards – to make the Shelf Sides (2) ¾ x ¾ x 36” Square Dowels – to make the Cleats (6) ¼-inch Insert Nuts (4) 1½-inch Connecting Bolt (2) 2¼-inch Connecting Bolt Latex Gloves Cloth or Rag Sandpaper or Sanding Sponge Paint, Stain or Polyurethane Tools:

  • The Anti-Surburban Beach House: A New Build that Prioritizes Craft Over Style, Community over Privacy
    by Fan Winston on May 29, 2020 at 8:00 AM

    It’s natural to be influenced by your travels and to pepper your home with interior souvenirs. For instance, after vacationing in the Southwest one year, I became enamored with desert style and promptly picked up a few potted succulents, a Cosanti wind bell, and a couple throw pillows in that peach-coral hue so popular in

  • Kitchen of the Week: A Sensitive and Considered Renovation, by Australian Kitchen Maker Cantilever
    by Fan Winston on May 28, 2020 at 8:00 AM

    The Japanese-esque open timber shelving, the streamlined white cabinets, the black steel window frames, the cutout drawer pulls, the compact footprint: this kitchen in Melbourne by Cantilever, an Australian custom kitchen systems company, checks off all our boxes. It’s owned by artist and former furniture maker Martin Tighe and his partner Jennifer. After raising their

  • Yokato Bath and Kitchen Fixtures, Made in Australia
    by Meredith Swinehart on May 28, 2020 at 7:00 AM

    Currently admiring: the Yokato Collection of solid brass bath and kitchen fixtures from fixtures manufacturer Brodware, a family-owned company making hardware in Australia since 1964. Go to Brodware for more info. For more Faucets & Fixtures, see Handmade Ceramic Sinks for the Kitchen, New from Devol and Trend Alert: 10 DIY Faucets Made from Plumbing

  • 5 Favorites: Modern Wood Paneled Baths
    by Alexa Hotz on May 27, 2020 at 10:00 AM

    Wood paneling adds an organic element to otherwise spare spaces; here are our favorites.

  • 10 Easy Pieces: Rain Shower Heads
    by Alexa Hotz on May 27, 2020 at 8:00 AM

    Like high thread count sheets, a rain shower head has the effect of instantly transporting you to a five star hotel (personally, I imagine the Ritz overlooking the Place Vendôme in Paris). If you’re keen on the immersive, overhead drench showering experience, a rain-style shower is one of those little luxuries that improves a daily

  • Refinishing Pine Floors So They’re Light & Airy (Not Dark & Yellowed)
    by Sherry Petersik on May 27, 2020 at 6:31 PM

    Alternate title: putting the floor in Florida. I’ll pause while you slap your knee. I’m telling you, I’ve got mom jokes for days. And speaking of days, I googled this topic for days on end. And let me tell you, finding someone who shared actual photos and an exact rundown of what floor products they used on pine floors to get the result we were aiming for was BLEAK. We were looking for a soft and light end result (not darker or more amber-toned/yellowed, which seems to be what pine likes to do, especially if it’s sealed with regular old oil based sealer – even just the clear stuff yellows it significantly). Oak floor refinishing info is endlessly available by the way. But straight pine pics & details about achieving a softer & lighter just-sanded look… not so much. In fact our contractor said most people rip out their old pine floors and replace them with white oak to get that lighter and not amber look and I was like AHHH MY EARS ARE BLEEDING WHO RIPS OUT GORGEOUS ORIGINAL HARDWOOD FLOORS?! Continue reading Refinishing Pine Floors So They’re Light & Airy (Not Dark & Yellowed) at Young House Love.

  • The Outside Of Our Florida House: Before & Now!
    by Sherry Petersik on May 20, 2020 at 6:34 PM

    You guys. I am very excited about this post. And John’s computer froze and crashed two times this morning while we were trying to work on this, and my enthusiasm STILL ENDURES, which is a good indication of just how into this I am. I’m going to try to let the pics do all the talking because I just want to get this post UP AND INTO THE WORLD! So without further ado, here is what our house looked like back in February when we offered on it. Remember it was a super rainy/overcast span of two days when we checked it out (as is our tradition of buying houses – more on that here). Didn’t matter. Look who was very excited back then too: And this is our house as of yesterday morning when we took these pics (just with our phone! Continue reading The Outside Of Our Florida House: Before & Now! at Young House Love.

  • #175: Our Big Move Is Officially Underway (& We Have Some Predictions)
    by John Petersik on May 18, 2020 at 5:00 AM

    While we’re getting settled in our new house in Florida, we’ve got one last episode for you that we recorded in Richmond. In fact, we took a moment as “Past John & Sherry” to make some predictions for what our moving day might look like, along with our hopes-slash-fears for our first night in our new home. We’re also talking about temporary, affordable, and easy-to-change decor ideas that are great for renters and homeowners alike, thanks to interviewing an expert on the subject named Medina Grillo. She was full of smart solutions and also took the opportunity to bust some myths about being a renter. Plus, the Instagram account that has us in stitches, and what we’re bringing for our kids on our 12-hour drive to Florida. You can also find this episode on your favorite podcast listening app, like Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, TuneIn Radio, Stitcher, and Spotify. Continue reading #175: Our Big Move Is Officially Underway (& We Have Some Predictions) at Young House Love.

  • A Look At How Far Our House’s Exterior Has Come
    by John Petersik on May 13, 2020 at 12:59 PM

    We’re currently still in Richmond (not for much longer though!), and in order to share a huge progress post about our Florida house’s exterior, we want to be there in person so we can take tons of progress photos that’ll explain a lot more and make that post exceptionally exciting. So that’s coming your way next week (yes, by this time next week we’ll definitely be living there!), but buckle up because this post is not a consolation prize. It’s just as dramatic as the before & afters of our current house’s interior, which we shared a few weeks back. In fact, our Richmond house’s outside transformation could probably be filed under: “Biggest update we’ve ever made. Ever.” So let’s get right into it. We actually forgot that we had filmed a before tour of this house’s exterior, but then a bunch of you requested a final exterior video tour just like the one we did inside. Continue reading A Look At How Far Our House’s Exterior Has Come at Young House Love.

  • #174: That Time A Psychic Came To Our House
    by John Petersik on May 11, 2020 at 5:00 AM

    On the cusp of our big Florida move, we take one last look at how downsizing and living for three weeks without almost all of our worldly possessions has changed our view of our “stuff” – including what we miss the most, and why it’s not what we expected. Plus experts predict how the pandemic may change the way people renovate and build homes moving forward. From floor plan changes to smart technology, it’s interesting to see what they think might carry on for years to come. We also stumble into a very random discussion about astrology, pet psychics, and whether the stars can tell us where in the world we really should be living. You can also find this episode on your favorite podcast listening app, like Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, TuneIn Radio, Stitcher, and Spotify. Continue reading #174: That Time A Psychic Came To Our House at Young House Love.

  • Home Tour: How This Designer Built A Beautiful Modern Traditional Guest Home For His Dad To Age In Place
    by Ryann Miller on May 28, 2020 at 6:00 PM

    Today is your lucky day ladies and gentlemen. Rarely do we post two reveals in a row, but we are feeling generous and, well, VERY inspired by both designers we are featuring today. So get excited for another beautiful home tour because we’re about to dive right in. Long Beach based Interior Designer, Shaun Crha,… Read More The post Home Tour: How This Designer Built A Beautiful Modern Traditional Guest Home For His Dad To Age In Place appeared first on Emily Henderson.

  • Looking For A Home “Update” Project? This Home Has 5 Ideas That Will Inspire You HARD
    by Jess Bunge on May 28, 2020 at 8:00 AM

    I think that small reno or “update” projects are on a lot of our minds since the weather is nice (read: already extremely hot) and these types of projects help to keep boredom at a minimum thus sanity at a maximum. Thoughts like, “How can I make my home feel more special?” or “What are… Read More The post Looking For A Home “Update” Project? This Home Has 5 Ideas That Will Inspire You HARD appeared first on Emily Henderson.

  • You Don’t Need A Pool To Cool Off in Your Backyard: All Of Our Favorite (And Still Available) Hot Tubs, Inflatable Pools and Water Toys)
    by Jess Bunge on May 27, 2020 at 6:00 PM

    I don’t know if the heat has hit where you live but I can tell you that it has hit California hard and the idea of dipping into a (not too cold because I’m a wimp) pool is what I need. But alas, I have no pool where I am but have decided that I… Read More The post You Don’t Need A Pool To Cool Off in Your Backyard: All Of Our Favorite (And Still Available) Hot Tubs, Inflatable Pools and Water Toys) appeared first on Emily Henderson.

  • We Discovered the Easiest Way to Mock-Up a Room Design Plan (It’s Not Photoshop)
    by Mallory Wackerman on May 27, 2020 at 8:00 AM

    When I was 16 I decided I wanted to start learning about interior design for the same reason everyone wants start to learning about interior design: my room was ugly and I wanted to redecorate. So I bought two interior design books: Domino’s Book of Decorating and Elements of Style (obviously because Emily’s book wasn’t… Read More The post We Discovered the Easiest Way to Mock-Up a Room Design Plan (It’s Not Photoshop) appeared first on Emily Henderson.

  • Sara’s Kitchen “Update” Spirals Into A full Renovation (Plus – Help Her Choose A Design Plan)
    by Sara Tramp on May 26, 2020 at 8:00 AM

    Recently, I decided that I was going to put all my #shelterinplace energy into one room – my kitchen. I spend most of my free time in there these days after all. And last week I shared my initial plan for a $3k budget, kitchen UPDATE. Last week feels so long ago. Almost as if… Read More The post Sara’s Kitchen “Update” Spirals Into A full Renovation (Plus – Help Her Choose A Design Plan) appeared first on Emily Henderson.